Shwedagon Pagoda Guide

Most visitors to Shwedagon Pagoda climbed up the Singuttara Hill by one of four stairways or zaungdans. Shwedagon Pagoda, like most other pagodas in Myanmar, has four stairways or zaungdans, one on each side of the pagoda (north, south, east and west). The stairway that is most used by the foreign visitors is the Southern Stairway, which ascends from the direction of the city center. The stairway starts immediately at the end of the Shwedagon Pagoda Road, which runs straight from downtown Yangon (Rangoon). Shwedagon Pagoda Road starts near Bogyoke Aung San Market, and runs north until it ends at the foot of the Shwedagon Pagoda. From here starts the Southern Stairway.


Mandalay Travel Guide – Kyauktawgyi Pagoda

Introduction and Historical Note

Located near the south stairway (Zaungdan) of Mandalay Hill is Kyauktawgyi Pagoda. The pagoda was the merit of the King Mindon who was also the builder of Mandalay. The construction of Kyauktawgyi Pagoda started in 1853 but could finish only in 1878, partly due to its massive size and partly to the palace rebellion of 1866. It was modeled after famous Ananda Temple of Bagan, with the main structure being a huge sitting Buddha Image, carved from a single massive block of marble. The original marble read more


Mandalay Travel Guide – Maha Myatmuni Pagoda

A visit to Mandalay would not be complete without a visit to Maha Muni (Maha Myat Muni, also spelled Mahamyatmuni or Maha Myatmuni or Mahamuni) Buddha image. Considered as the most sacred Buddha image in Mandalay and in Myanmar, Maha Muni Buddha image draws a large crowd of devotees from all over Myanmar. The pagoda is also known as Rakhine (Arakan) Paya or Payagyi (Great Pagoda).

Legend

During the time of Gautama Buddha, King Sanda Thuria (Chandra Surya) of the Kingdom of Dhannavati, the ancient read more


Shwedagon Pagoda Guide – Nine wonders of Shwedagon Pagoda

For detailed guide to Shwedagon Pagoda, please see our article Shwedagon Pagoda Guide.

Traditionally, Burmese believe that there are nine wonders in Shwedagon Pagoda. Burmese Buddhists believe these wonders could grant your wishes come true.

Tawagu Ruby Eye Buddha

1. Tawagu Wish-Fulfilling Buddha, which is located in a niche behind the Eastern Stairway, on the upper platform. Only men are allowed into this upper platform but there is a television in the Eastern Devotion Hall where the CCTV image of the read more

Shwedagon Pagoda Guide – Floor Plan and Map

Shwedagon-floor-plan
Shwedagon Pagoda Floor Plan

This is article is floor plan and map of Shwedagon Pagoda. For a complete guide, see the article Complete Shwedagon Pagoda Guide.

1. Southern stairway
2. Western stairway
3. Northern stairway
4. Eastern stairway
5. Southern main shrine – Temple of the Konagomana Buddha
6. Chinese Merited Association Tazaung (Buddhist Shrine)
7. Hall of Golden and Silver Hills
8. Shrine of Sun and Moon
9. Commemorative Column for first Rangoon University students’ read more

Shwedagon Pagoda Guide – History

This article is history of Shwedagon Pagoda. For a complete guide, see the article Complete Shwedagon Pagoda Guide.

Shwedagon-eveningAccording to legend, Shwedagon Pagoda was built more than 2,500 years ago during the time of Lord Buddha. The two merchant brothers from then Okkalapa (now Yangon) met with Gautama Buddha shortly after he attained enlightenment, and became the first disciples of Lord Buddha. Gautama Buddha gave them eight hair relics which they brought back to their country. In Okkalapa, they read more

Kyaikhtiyo (Golden Rock) Travel Story – 4

28 October, 2007

8:25 AM

At Yathe-taung, we paid 1,300 kyat (US$ 1.20) for bus and arrived back to the base camp. I was quite hungry by that time but I was also running low on money so could only had oiled rice with fried egg.

On the way back, I had some questions popping up in my mind about the trip and Kyaikhtiyo. I couldn’t find the answers. If any of you could answer these questions, please let all of us know.

1. In Kyaikhtiyo legend, it was said that the pagoda was built on the rock which resembles read more