Road Transport in Myanmar (Burma) – Highway

Introduction

Like most other countries in the world, road transportation is the most important communication in Myanmar. Most towns and cities are accessible only by land route. Only a few towns and cities are connected by railway lines. Even if they are connected by rail link, the condition of train services in Myanmar make it too difficult for most ordinary people to use railway as the major means of travel in Myanmar. Some towns are also reachable by rivers but river travel is very slow compared to read more


Bagan by bus from Yangon (Rangoon) – Part 2

The Yangon – Bagan bus will first drive along Yangon-Pyay (Prome) road, which is quite a good road compared to other roads in Myanmar. There are very few bumps and the road is generally smooth. Before it enters Pyay (Prome), it will stop at Ye Pyar for dinner at around 7 PM. The restaurant is a nice one which sells delicious Myanmar food. However, there is no English menu. Just go and look at the Myanmar dishes and order the one you like. Don’t try to order something like fried rice or read more


Bagan by bus from Yangon (Rangoon) – Part 1

Cheapest way to travel to Bagan (Pagan) is by bus. However, it is not the most convenient way of travel in Myanmar. The roads are usually rough and bumpy in Myanmar, and buses are usually old, dirty and crowded. But for those who are budget conscious, the following is a rough guide to go to Bagan by bus from Yangon (Rangoon).

There are a number of highway buses that run between Yangon and Bagan. Some of them are ordinary buses where buses are very old, dirty, crowded, and slow and carry a lot of read more


Myanmar (Burma) highway express buses

Like most countries in the world, highway buses form the most important part of public transportation in Myanmar. Most towns and cities in Myanmar can only be reached by land road. Even to major cities like Yangon and Mandalay, buses are the cheapest and easiest mode of travel for most people in Myanmar. Air fare is quite expensive in Myanmar and most people in Myanmar cannot afford to pay for the air ticket price. Sale of train tickets are tightly controlled and difficult to get for ordinary read more

Stilwell Road: Burma’s Stilwell Road Revive

Ledo-Road
Ledo Road (Stilwell Road)

“It was a road some said couldn’t be built. Most of the men ordered to make it happen were African American soldiers sorted into Army units by the color of their skin.

As World War II raged, they labored day and night in the jungles of Burma, sometimes halfway up 10,000-foot mountains, drenched by 140 inches of rain in the five-month monsoon season. They spanned raging rivers and pushed through swamps thick with bloodsucking leeches and swarms of biting read more

Kalay Falam Hakha Road

Construction workers on the way to Falam

Buses leave Kalay to Hakha everyday from Tarhan Bus Terminal. There are two bus lines, Chin Taung Tan and Shwe Chindit. One bus each leaves from each line everyday except Sunday. The buses leave the terminal at 5.00 AM in the morning.

I took Chin Taung Tan bus on early morning. The bus left the station at 5.15 AM but because it picked up passengers from the town, it was already 6:00 when the bus left Kalay. As soon as the bus left Kalay, the road suddenly went up and started to climb up the mountain. About 15 minutes after leaving Kalay, we stopped at on place on the road on the slope of a mountain, and prayed Lord for protection of the passengers. They prayed in Chin Language. It is customary, whenever somebody leaves for a trip, those left at home pray for the safety of the one. This is a very beautiful custom of Chin people.
Bridge on Manipur River
The road is quite wide and good, with good hard ground. At 8:00 AM we reached Thai Ngin village, 32 miles away from Kalay, where the road to Tiddim started. At 8:40 we reached Var Lone village, 42 miles away from Kalay. We had our lunch at Cherry Restaurant. It was still too early for me to have lunch so I didn’t have anything there. 50 miles away from Kalay is where road to Reed Village started. Reed is a village on the Indian border, where the famous heart shaped lake was. At Lone Taw village, 53 miles away from Kalay, I saw many stair case firms, alot of them and very beautiful. Economy here seemed to be good for a mountainous village. At Lone Ban village, about 59 miles from Kalay, I saw many more beautiful and fertile firms. There is also a station hospital and a high school. Lone Ban is quite a large village.
Memorial Stones from Chin Hills
After Lone Ban, the road started to went down again, and at 70 miles, we reached Bar Bridge, which crossed Manipur River. After crossing Manipur River, the road winded up again at reached Falam at 12:15 PM. Falam is about 80 miles from Kalay. Falam is quite a large town built on the slope of a mountain. Being the former capital of Chin State, it still maintain its past glory, with many two and three storied brick buildings, and a large Baptist church. Girls in Falam are famous for their beauty, claimed to be the most beautiful in all Chin State. Road near Falam was quite worn out. From Falam to Hakha, about half of the road on the side of Falam was quite good, but the other half on Hakha side was severely damaged. We reached Hakha at 4:30 PM. This article was originally posted at Kalay – Falam – Hakha Road | Bamarlay’s Diary.

How to go to Mindat in Chin State

Bus to MindatIf you are interested in going to Mindat, here is a guide. You cannot go there direct from Yangon. First, go to Pakokku, a big city on the west bank of Irrawaddy (Ayarwaddy). To go to Pakokku, you have two options. One is the direct bus trip to Pakokku from Yangon. The buses are quite old and slow, and carry a lot of goods and cargo. I recommend the second option which is to take a bus to Pagan (Bagan) and from there, cross the Irrawaddy. The bus to Bagan leaves around 3 PM from Yangon, and read more