Thingyan Sar

What is Thingyan Sar? Probably you might never heard of this term before. It might be a strange term and concept for outsiders, even for our South East asian neighbours from Thailand, Laos and Cambodia. Actually, thingyan sar is an integral part of Myanmar people.

Thingyan sar literally means words of Thingyan, which is Myanmar counter part of Thai Songkran or water festival. Thingyan is also the Myanmar new year celebration. Essentially, thingyan sar is a written prediction of what would happen read more



PCO – Public Phones in Myanmar

Myanmar public phone

This is what a PCO looks like in Myanmar. PCO stands for Public Call Outlet, a public telephone. Unlike those from other countries, there are no public phones using coins or card. Instead, at a PCO, there are one or two ordinary fixed land line telephones with an attendance to mark time and charge the user. Although not as convenient and as private as true public telephone booths, it is a popular and widely used public communication read more

Yaw Buddhish Religious Custom

I was visiting a small remote town (actually a large village) in Yaw region. It was Laung-shae, a very ancient town in Myanmar, and situated in Saw township. I saw these local people on a religious procession on a Buddhist holy day. They are carrying a Buddha’s image from the monastery read more

Yaw Region

Yaw MorningYaw region, a region comprises of Gantgaw, Hteeling and Saw Townships, is a region traditionally renown for, or more correctly, notorious for witchcraft. Many Burmese believe that people in Yaw region are masters of witchcraft very well, and they are afraid of the Yaw people. However, I believe these are all false rumors, or rural myth.

The region is situated between the two mountain ranges – Chin Hills in the read more

Buses in Yangon (Rangoon)

Yangon BusIf you ever traveled to Yangon for the first time, you will be amazed by the public buses running the streets of Rangoon. Not only are they old and worn out, they are also overcrowded. And some of them date back to the pre-world war 2 era. Many wooden buses from the colonial period still run the streets of Rangoon. They are old, dirty, crowded and break down easily and frequently. The roof is also quite low so tall passengers have to bend their neck and back when standing. However, those are not the only buses that run the streets of Rangoon. The government has imported larger, newer (comparatively)second hand buses from Japan and Korea in recent years. They are far more larger than the older buses and more comfortable, but most of them are already quite worn out and break down as often. One thing you might notice in Yangon public buses is that they are overcrowded most of the time. Passengers were packed into buses like herds of animals. But people are quite used to this and do not complain much. Rangoon bus drivers and conductors are quite notorious for their rude behavior, carelessness and recklessness. More often than not, they shouted at the passengers push them roughly in and out of the bus, and break traffic laws easily. Although the punishment to this offense is a hefty fine and, for habitual offenders, a suspension of the driving/conductor license, most passengers accept this as a norm and don’t bother to complain. Fare for buses is charged depending on the sectors you travel. The trips are usually subdivided into two or more sectors, and fare is collected for each sector. Usual fare for a sector is 20 kyats. Sometimes, the conductor pretends to forget a change and a passenger has to remind him for the change.