Buses in Yangon (Rangoon)

Yangon BusIf you ever traveled to Yangon for the first time, you will be amazed by the public buses running the streets of Rangoon. Not only are they old and worn out, they are also overcrowded. And some of them date back to the pre-world war 2 era. Many wooden buses from the colonial period still run the streets of Rangoon. They are old, dirty, crowded and break down easily and frequently. The roof is also quite low so tall passengers have to bend their neck and back when standing. However, those are not the only buses that run the streets of Rangoon. The government has imported larger, newer (comparatively)second hand buses from Japan and Korea in recent years. They are far more larger than the older buses and more comfortable, but most of them are already quite worn out and break down as often. One thing you might notice in Yangon public buses is that they are overcrowded most of the time. Passengers were packed into buses like herds of animals. But people are quite used to this and do not complain much. Rangoon bus drivers and conductors are quite notorious for their rude behavior, carelessness and recklessness. More often than not, they shouted at the passengers push them roughly in and out of the bus, and break traffic laws easily. Although the punishment to this offense is a hefty fine and, for habitual offenders, a suspension of the driving/conductor license, most passengers accept this as a norm and don’t bother to complain. Fare for buses is charged depending on the sectors you travel. The trips are usually subdivided into two or more sectors, and fare is collected for each sector. Usual fare for a sector is 20 kyats. Sometimes, the conductor pretends to forget a change and a passenger has to remind him for the change.

Life on Irrawaddy (Ayarwaddy or Ayeyarwaddy)

Life on IrrawaddyIf you ever sailed along the great river Irrawaddy (Ayarwaddy or Ayeyarwaddy), the largest and longest river in Myanmar, you would notice one thing. Life is almost as it was sixty years ago. Old wooden ships still run along the river as it was before the World War II. Workers carry rice sacks over their shoulders, loading and unloading ships docked at the piers. Naked children swim in the muddy river while their mothers bath on the river bank; the same thing that their mothers and grand mothers read more


Pork on Stick (Wet-thar-dote-htoe)

Wet Thar Dote Htoe (Roasted Pork Intestine)This is a favorite Burmese food. Originally from Chinese community in Myanmar, it has become a popular food in cities. Called “Wet-Thar-Dote-Htoe”, it literally means “Pork on Stick”. Various parts of the pig are cooked with soy-bean sauce and seasoning. The parts include carious internal organs like intestine, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, tongue as well as meat, skin and cartilage. They are then cut into small pieces, and put on tiny bamboo sticks and served. read more


Chin Head Basket

Chin head BasketHave you ever heard about head basket? Well, we have in Chin Hills. Lets call it Chin head basket. It is a kind of basket that you carry by hanging around your head with a string. You don’t carry it by hand. The basket is quite a large one, big enough to carry a 5 gallon water container. And people, even young women and children, carry them by a string hung over their head. It is a tiring thing to do so. I once tried to carry one with some weight in it but couldn’t carry more read more

Myanmar Breakfast

Breakfast for many people in Myanmar is fried rice. Usually it is a mixture of cooked rice and other leftovers from the evening before. One or two egg is often stirred into the fried rice. Sometimes, some slices of fried Chinese pork sausage is added to it. Most usually, a kind of steamed beans sold by vendors in the early morning is added. This makes a cheap but tasty and nutritious breakfast for most families.

mohinga seller

Another popular breakfast for Myanmar people is mohinga (monhinga). This is a read more

Teashops in Myanmar

Teashop - Mandalay
Teashop from Myanmar (Photo by Nice Kitty)

Teashops are important and integral part of life in Myanmar. As a foreigner who first arrives to Myanmar, you will be surprised to see so many teashops in Yangon and everywhere in Myanmar. They are everywhere in every street. And there are always customers in every teashop. Nowhere in South-East Asia would you find such a large number of teashop. When I was young, there were not as many teashops as now. And the attitude of our parents at that time was that “sitting at a read more